DAY 7: LOST TRADITIONS [CULTURE THE NOBLE ART OF SELF PRESERVATION]

World wide, the most saccharine, prized treasures are seldom within easy reach. Think about diamond and gold. It takes a fortune to retrieve these jewels. However, they are worth every bead of sweat shed in search for, as they are premium in nature. One if Uganda’s share of endowment that is out of reach, yet totally Worth the pursuit is Ssese island.
As we headed towards the land of jewels we were surrounded by treacherous waters that waved the ferry’s stability. The sudden storm came to a halt over period of time and to our hearts relief we could now see the island. Welcomed to this beauteous land, we the travellers were given a sense of serenity and being off the radar.

Treasures

Our tour guide Kassim that we attained told us that this is partly the reason why it comes as a favorite for honeymooners. The kind of view that instantly stole our hearts was the way the sky touched the water. We began with a trip through palm trees that concealed a cave that stood the test of time. Here we found a caretaker who took us through the history.

A cave with a story

“Long time ago,” he said, “The Basese people inhabited the island with enriched culture. However in 1902 they were evacuated by the British due to a Ssese fly infestation that was making their tribe extinct. The last of their kind were shipped to Buganda kingdom where their culture was diluted. Ten years later the British took monkeys to the island to test whether the it was habitable.”
He continued by telling us that in 1992 the island was deemed habitable and the Basese were allowed to come home but most had lost their culture. This cave stood as an epitome of their cultural beliefs. It held various antiques and offerings to the gods. Different rituals take place within the cave like prayers for success. 

Artifacts within the cave

Now the fading tradition of the people, the cave is now used as a tourist site. It’s floor is covered with thatch where visitors sit and listen to stories of the Basese.

I travellers listening to stories of the past

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